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Ansari Daniel & Coch Donna (2006). « Bridges over troubled waters : Education and cognitive neuroscience ». Trends in cognitive sciences, vol. 10, n° 4, avril, p. 146–151. ISSN 1364-6613. 
Added by: Catherine Reverdy (25 Jul 2013 11:44:20 Europe/Paris)   Last edited by: Catherine Reverdy (23 Aug 2013 15:46:32 Europe/Paris)
Resource type: Journal Article
DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2006.02.007
ID no. (ISBN etc.): 1364-6613
BibTeX citation key: Ansari2006
Categories: Apprentissages et psychologie
Subcategories: Neurosciences et éducation
Keywords: enseignement, neurosciences
Creators: Ansari, Coch
Collection: Trends in cognitive sciences
Views: 855/1264
Views index: 24%
Popularity index: 6%
Abstract     
Recently there has been growing interest in and debate about the relation between cognitive neuroscience and education. Our goal is to advance the debate beyond both recitation of potentially education-related cognitive neuroscience findings and the claim that a bridge between fields is chimerical. In an attempt to begin a dialogue about mechanisms among students, educators, researchers and practitioner-scientists, we propose that multiple bridges can be built to make connections between education and cognitive neuroscience, including teacher training, researcher training and collaboration. These bridges--concrete mechanisms that can advance the study of mind, brain and education--will benefit both educators and cognitive neuroscientists, who will gain new perspectives for posing and answering crucial questions about the learning brain.
  
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