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Prensky Marc (2001). « Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants ». On the Horizon, vol. 9, n° 5, octobre. En ligne : <http://www.marcprensky. ... igrants%20-%20Part1.pdf>. 
Added by: Laure Endrizzi (21 Jun 2007 12:11:56 Europe/Paris)   Last edited by: RĂ©mi Thibert (29 Aug 2012 15:46:22 Europe/Paris)
Resource type: Journal Article
BibTeX citation key: Prensky2001b
Categories: TICE
Keywords: culture numérique, jeu, travail collaboratif
Creators: Prensky
Collection: On the Horizon
Views: 264/3119
Views index: 38%
Popularity index: 9.5%
URLs     http://www.marcpre ... ts%20-%20Part1.pdf
Abstract     
It is amazing to me how in all the hoopla and debate these days about the decline of education in the US we ignore the most fundamental of its causes. Our students have changed radically. Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.

Today's students have not just changed incrementally from those of the past, nor simply changed their slang, clothes, body adornments, or styles, as has happened between generations previously. A really big discontinuity has taken place. One might even call it a "singularity" - an event which changes things so fundamentally that there is absolutely no going back. This so-called "singularity" is the arrival and rapid dissemination of digital technology in the last decades of the 20th century.

Today’s students - K through college - represent the first generations to grow up with this new technology. They have spent their entire lives surrounded by and using computers, videogames, digital music players, video cams, cell phones, and all the other toys and tools of the digital age. Today's average college grads have spent less than 5,000 hours of their lives reading, but over 10,000 hours playing video games (not to mention 20,000 hours watching TV). Computer games, email, the Internet, cell phones and instant messaging are integral parts of their lives.

It is now clear that as a result of this ubiquitous environment and the sheer volume of their interaction with it, today's students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors. These differences go far further and deeper than most educators suspect or realize. "Different kinds of experiences lead to different brain structures, "says Dr. Bruce D. Berry of Baylor College of Medicine. As we shall see in the next installment, it is very likely that our students’ brains have physically changed - and are different from ours - as a result of how they grew up. But whether or not this is literally true, we can say with certainty that their thinking patterns have changed. I will get to how they have changed in a minute.

What should we call these "new" students of today? Some refer to them as the N-[for Net]-gen or D-[for digital]-gen. But the most useful designation I have found for them is Digital Natives. Our students today are all "native speakers" of the digital language of computers, video games and the Internet.


So what does that make the rest of us? Those of us who were not born into the digital world but have, at some later point in our lives, become fascinated by and adopted many or most aspects of the new technology are, and always will be compared to them, Digital Immigrants.
Added by: Laure Endrizzi  Last edited by: RĂ©mi Thibert
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